Academic Web Sites

Current Eagle Academy web sites:

  1. The Anchorage School District staff page for my Math 4 and Educational Technology classes is used to display course descriptions, current topics, and homework assignments. It is maintained by  Site Builder.
  2. The EACS Articles and Blogs site is used by 6th grade tech students learning how to use basic HTML code to compose projects for publishing on the internet. It was created using Drupal.
  3. The EACS Tech Projects is used to publish student-created technology projects, and also as a way to make lesson materials available to the students. It was created using Google Sites.
  4. The EACS Grades site describes the Standards-Based Report Card system I developed for the classroom teachers. It allows them to enter proficiency level scores or percentages in Microsoft Excel workbooks and easily print individual or whole-class grade reports with Microsoft Word. The original page was made with Dreamweaver and was intended to give teachers a place to access the grading program instructions.
  5. The Gallery site is used to provide graphic materials for technology projects to EACS students. It was created using Piwigo, which enables images to be grouped in folders.  It also allows students to be able to upload images they have created for their projects.

Other Eagle Academy web sites:

  1. The EACS Math 7 site was used to manage instructional materials, lesson plans, and student achievement for a group of 6th graders working on 7th grade math. It was created using Google Sites, managed by the Anchorage School District, and requires a school district account to access.  It displays achievement in Saxon Math and Khan Academy by way of embedded MS Excel spreadsheets published on Microsoft OneDrive.
  2. The 2011-2012 Grade 1 Student Portfolios is a dormant, unfinished project. It was begun as a collaboration between 6th graders learning basic html and 1st graders who were writing and illustrating articles by hand. It is still worth looking at, and possibly finishing. The first graders’ self-portrait home page was made with Dreamweaver, and the sixth graders used Notepad to write the html code for subpages.
g1menu
Menu of 1st grader self-portraits

IditaRead

IditaRead is a Google Maps site that displays student reading team positions on the Iditarod trail from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska.

Corresponding Microsoft Excel workbooks provide an easy and exact method for computing trail position of teams or individuals. Macro-enabled and non-macro workbooks are available, as well as the Google Maps KMZ file, on my tech Project Documents page in the Iditarod folder.

A series of articles and instructions can be found starting here.


 

Kasuun 6

The Kasuun 6 site was created in response to outstanding student writing at a school I visited.  It is in the developmental stage at present. It was created using WordPress.


SchoolTown

SchoolTown Classroom Environment

The SchoolTown site, created with Weebly, describes an advanced technology-managed classroom environment that I developed and used as a regular classroom teacher during the late ’80s to early 2000’s. The system empowered and motivated students to take personal ownership in all aspects of their daily educational experience.

The SchoolTown Cart Driver and the Lunch Patrol Cart

 


Williwaw Classroom Web Site

The 1994-1995 Williwaw Elementary School classroom web site was created with Microsoft FrontPage and made extensive use of image maps. Inspiration for some of the graphics came from Dr. Ozone.
Room 11 classroom web site menu
Pop-up window of student Data Processor and Stay-in-the Green manager.

Technology Performance Standards

The Technology Performance Standards site was built in the early ’90’s as part of a joint UAA/ASD project to develop comprehensive technology standards for K-6 students in Anchorage, Alaska. The site has links to State and National Standards as well.

I made the site with frames using MS Front Page. The site is quite dated, as the school district abandoned the project for more general standards.

A number of people spent a considerable amount of time discussing and developing specific performance standards for grade-level groups. Problems arose as the powers-that-be considered the performance standards too difficult and too involved.

Although the site is obsolete, it is quite interesting to see what at one time was considered to be proficient technology skills for K-12 students.